Category: explore

London, Now and Then

My first impression of London, when I stepped off the Heathrow-Express at Paddington Station, was that it didn’t sound like London. I heard accents and languages from many other countries, but the British accent, which had been trained into my American mind via television and film, blended in among the many tourists and migrants from ...

In Honor of International Women’s Day, My Favorite Scene From My Favorite Czech New Wave Film

Most are probably familiar with the 1960s French New Wave film movement popularized by Jean-Luc Godard. Around the same era there was a similar movement happening in Czechoslovakia, when films arose with loose narrative structures and absurd situations. Pioneer female filmmaker Věra Chytilová made Daisies in 1966 about two teenage girls behaving badly. The film ...

Bookish in Manhattan: Favorite Libraries and Bookstores

I’ve been to New York City a number of times with family, friends, and groups. These trips have always been a lot of fun and memorable, but there is so much to do in New York and the only way I could make an itinerary around the things that I wanted to do, without compromise, ...

NYD’s Top 8 Posts of 2018

It’s interesting to go back and compare my posts from year to year, allowing me to take inventory of how Neptune Your Dial evolves and potential changes for the coming year. This year, I noticed a shift in content as well as a clearer idea of what I want this blog to represent. I have ...

A Digital Exhibition of the History of U.S. Public Libraries

The United States has a long-running respect and tradition when it comes to public libraries. Libraries came about as an answer to the Enlightenment era, when science, reading, and learning found significance in much of the western world. Access to books was difficult for most people pre-Revolutionary War. Benjamin Franklin, along with members of his ...

The Boston Public Library… *sigh*

Boston has a long history. Not just in the founding of the U.S., but also in literature and the arts. On a recent trip, I stopped in the Boston Public Library’s Central Library at Copley Square. It was built in two parts, the McKim Building and the Johnson Building. The McKim Building drips history with ...

Literary and Bookish Places in Atlanta

Atlanta might not seem like a literary city, but the home of Margaret Mitchell and a slew of independent bookstores offers many attractions, events and activities for bibliophiles. Georgia State University and Emory University both have highly regarded English programs, growing the city’s bookish population each year. On any given week, established authors can be ...

A Day in Concord, MA: Home of Transcendentalism and Classic American Literature

Concord, Massachusetts was a incubator for enlightenment and philosophy during the early to mid-nineteenth century. Key members of America’s transcendentalist movement and other writers called Concord home, including Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Louisa May Alcott and her father, Amos Bronson Alcott, and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The town is steeped in literary history, reminiscent of ...

Lonescapade: My First Solo Trip

A little over two years ago, as I went through a transitional period in my life- getting my first adult job and questioning the things I wanted- I took a trip to Charleston, South Carolina. The place is not hugely significant nor the means of getting there, as Charleston is a mere four hour drive ...

The YouTube Channel that Recreates History

Through a recent expedition of the internet, rambling down the endless narrows and paths that make up YouTube, I came across Crow’s Eye Production. This channel aims to give a historically accurate taste of the past through high production value videos. Ever wondered how 18th century pockets worked? Or what people actually wore during the ...